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Wild Daffodils of Farndale

Free Photos, North York Moors, North Yorkshire

Article By: Dave Roberts.

First Published: 7 April 2011

Like sleeping beauties along the outstandingly pretty nature reserve of Farndale, within the North York Moors National Park, sleeps until April each year one of Springtime's most impressive natural shows.

If there's a choice between the larger headed daffodils commonly grown in our gardens, or the smaller more gentle wild daffodils of Farndale, then this is a complete 'no brainer'. If size matters, then smaller is most definitely a winner in this pulling competition. And pull they do, as I walked along the valley a thought passed through my mind: if you were to arrive in Farndale from another planet, you could be forgiven for thinking that you had landed at the friendliest place on earth. Being from another planet you might not distinguish between the accented greetings of the Irish, French, German, Dutch as well as the variety of English accents too. Everyone friendly and joyful, that is the true overture which these little beauties give to those who visit Farndale at this time of year. Their yellow carpet fills the hearts with joy and people from many places come to delight in this wonderful natural experience. My hot tip is that if you are to visit Farndale for the daffodils, then allow plenty of time for the many friendly people you will meet.

The North York Moors National Park Authority are responsible for the conservation of the Farndale Nature Reserve and they can be truly proud of their achievements. It is at least ten years since I last visited the valley, I really was unsure of what I would find. Yes I expected to see some daffodils, but I didn't expect that in the decade since my last visit, the daffodils would have multiplied so much in number, they now create several wonderful awe inspiring yellow carpets which grab then behold your contemplation.

Within wooded areas along the mile and a bit walk, the wild daffodils run down embankments creating the appearance of yellow rivers towards the bottom of the valley where they confluence with the River Dove, the Dove like a mirror reflecting upwards the heads of the daffodils adding effect to the natural grandeur.

The wild daffodils are thought to have been introduced to Farndale by monks from the 12th century Rievaulx Abbey. Rievaulx Abbey was dissolved in 1538 by King Henry VIII, therefore we can safely say that these daffodils - although not quite as old as the hills - have been presenting their impressive blooms in the valley of Farndale for hundreds of years.

Whilst many people visit Farndale to see the flash of springtime yellow, there is much more happening too. Numerous birds are actively building nests, some are courting and some are in dispute. As I walked the valley from Low Mill I saw Robin's, Treecreepers, Chaffinch, Pheasant and a very diverse scenery, you might say: it's not all daffodils. In the fields to the other side of the river, new lambs were playfully leaping around and on arrival at Daffy Caffy a rather friendly Yorkshire Terrier ran out to greet me with it's tail wagging.

My mission was (needless to say) to capture some photos, I deliberately waited until later afternoon to arrive, I prefer the light at this time of day. Bright sun and blue sky has a bleaching effect on photographic images, by leaving the timing until the sun was heading down toward the west, I was able to catch the remaining light which illuminates the yellow blooms, in the dark wooded areas shafts of light created a contrast between the darkness of the trees and the flowering daffodils, demonstrating their density and highlighting their yellow carpet. I have included a selection of images from my visit which I hope you enjoy.

I genuinely would recommend a visit to Farndale to discover for yourself this place of natural beauty. The North York Moors National Park Authority maintain a pathway along the river, you pass from one field to another separated with ancient dry stone walls and gates, each field offering up another experience.

Buses are laid on from Hutton Le Hole, there is more information available about public transport and planning your visit on the North York Moors National Park Authority Website.

North York Moors Website: http://www.northyorkmoors.org.uk/

 

 

 

 

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